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About

The Virtual Curation Laboratory at VCU partnered with the U.S. Department of Defense’s Legacy Program to develop a digital data project that incorporates the use of a three-dimensional object scanner in recording American Indian and historic artifacts for analysis and conservation.

In the Virtual Curation Laboratory, project director Dr. Bernard K. Means works with a team of Virginia Commonwealth University undergraduate  and graduate students, as well as some alumni, to preserve the past and share it with the world. Funding from the Department of Defense’s Legacy Program helped establish our facility. The Virtual Curation Laboratory currently employs a NextEngine Desktop 3D scanner, a Go!Scan 50, an Einscan Pro 2x, a Structure Scanner, and photogrammetry to create digital models of archaeological, paleontological, and historical  objects. We partner with educators, museums and researchers from across the globe.

Project Director: Dr. Bernard K. Means; bkmeans@vcu.edu

Discussion

8 thoughts on “About

  1. How do I make a donation to VCL?

    Posted by Michael Pasenko | October 19, 2019, 8:57 pm
    • You can make a check out to Virginia Commonwealth University and put in the subject line “Virtual Curation Lab” and mail to Bernard K. Means, Virginia Commonwealth University, 312 North Shafer Street, RIchmond, VA 23284. It would have to come with a short letter explaining that it is a donation. Thanks for the question. Bernard

      Posted by bkmeans | October 20, 2019, 4:34 am
  2. Great post!

    Posted by bkmeans | July 28, 2020, 12:59 pm

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