//
you're reading...
VCU Archaeology

The good, the bad, and the ugly of blogging for the Virtual Curation Laboratory

by Bernard K. Means, Project Director

As part of the Blogging Archaeology blog carnival (details at Doug’s Archaeology), participants have been asked to address the good, the bad, and the ugly of blogging. Here are my brief thoughts:

The Good:

  • We are able to readily let people know what we are doing in the Virtual Curation Laboratory
  • My student interns get the opportunity to hone their writing skills as they communicate their interests
  • The blogs from my student interns and staff provide me with different perspectives on how virtual curation is perceived and can be used in ways that I had not considered
  • I get feedback from outsiders who provide new directions for research or public outreach, and make me aware of audiences that I we can research with our research
  • We can link to the heritage locations from which we have obtained artifacts for 3D scanning, hopefully assisting these locations with meeting their missions
  • I improve my ability to write short passages

The Bad:

  • I sometimes feel a self-imposed pressure to post a blog entry before I am quite ready to talk about our research
  • I get little feedback to the blog entries themselves; people who follow the blog and comment seem to want to do this one-to-one offline

The Ugly:

  • Spam: most of my comments are from spam robots

As you can see, the Good for me outweighs easily the Bad or the Ugly!

Advertisements

Discussion

2 thoughts on “The good, the bad, and the ugly of blogging for the Virtual Curation Laboratory

  1. Your personal experience is similar to mine, certainly the bad.
    Very impressed with “My student interns get the opportunity . . . ” / “The blogs from my student interns and staff provide me …” , Very positive.

    Posted by Geoff Carter | January 23, 2014, 4:11 am

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Pingback: Blogging Archaeology #BlogArch – All of the Responses to the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly | Doug's Archaeology - January 5, 2014

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: